Monday, September 27, 2010

A possible future for the public education system.

We've all been through the "system" at one point, or about to finish, and I'm sure a large majority of you would agree that it's highly ineffective at actually producing it's final goal: preparing you for life and getting you a job or further schooling. Take for example what my state requires for me to graduate from high school, I need to take an art class. How does an art class get me a job in my career in IT? Most the of the core requirements are sound but anything outside of the basic math/science/social studies are absurd. Take another example: English courses. I've been learning the same basic grammar since the 6th grade and most of the books they want you to read are outdated ideas that my parents grew up with. Then finally in my Senior English class they ignore most of that bullshit and focus on stumbling your way through the SAT's written exam. That's all most of the final two years of high school was, trying to make sure you can bullshit your way through one test or another.


The system I'm proposing would go as followed:

It starts off as a primary school, here it would focus on teaching you basic skills such as math, sciences, ability of the English langauge, social studies, life skills, and a mixture of other classes to try and help students find a career. Life skills would focus on installing proper hygiene, diet, and exercise. The career classes would first focus on helping finding a niche to place students in for the next step in schooling.

After that the students would be placed into a higher level of schooling that would increase the levels of math and sciences. The whole focus of this step would be to find a placement for their next level of schooling and a possible career. The career classes would be much more diverse to choose from and students would start to pick a possible future. After they have picked a future path and their mastery of the required levels of math, sciences, ability of the English langauge, social studies, and life skills they would be able to move to the final level.

This level would be around the age group of high schoolers. At this level it would focus primarily on the student's career choices. If they were to pick a career in computers for example they would take classes that help build a background in programming and hardware. This level of schooling would be very flexible to prevent the college phenomenon of switching majors every few weeks. The whole purpose is to make sure you have a future and the background to build it. They would be sent to different schools focusing on the fields they want to go into to. Students who do not want to go into higher schooling would receive workforce training and be prepared for their life.

The final stage, if needed, is to go to a "college" level and learn your final skills. An example would be people going into the medical fields, would go here for their specialized job training with no need of extra pointless classes since they have already had a background built by the previous levels of schooling.
 

18 comments:

  1. Sounds like a pretty good system, but would it allow for a change of career after leaving? Like if you get into your late 20's and decide that the career path you chose isn't what you want anymore.

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  2. Sounds like a good plan. I don't think it needs further input. Nice post.

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  3. The great part about the system is that the whole point is to set up a background for life. All you would need to do is go back to some sort of job specialization training and you're back in the workforce.

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  4. What if I want to be a prostitute?

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  5. I definitely agree with the concept of specialized education in high school. Good post.

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  6. Education needs reform, young people such as yourself need to bring ideas to the assholes in DC.

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  7. I don't feel like teenagers should be allowed to make a decision like not receiving more education. That is something they will regret for the rest of their lives. I know if I had the option when I was younger to drop out of school I would of, but I'm really glad that didn't happen.

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  8. Parental guidance is a lovely thing to have. In my state you can't drop out until you're 16 and you can't drop out until you're 18 without parental consent. The whole point is by that age students know if their going on to college or not. The ones who wont need help in other ways rather than being shuffled to the side for students who want to go to college.

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  9. I'm not very fond of the system you've established. It forces kids to focus on a career way too early, so much so that if they change their mind later down the road, they basically have to go through the entire system again.

    Also, I dunno if you've taken an advanced English course or not (either an Honors or an AP course) or if I was just lucky, but my English courses in high school focused heavily not on grammar or literature study, but on rhetoric and analysis of arguments. Sure, we had to read The Scarlett Letter just like everyone else, but we also learned how to properly argue as well as spot logical fallacies - necessary skills in a world raised by Fox News.

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  10. Something I needed.

    I am currently doing a painting and decorating course to go self employed. At 19. I wanted to do it when I was 14, as many in my year (grade) were allowed to. I was declined, because I got good grades.

    Good grades limited my career. How the fuck does that work? I wasted years doing music at college instead because of it. I loved that part and learned a lot, but I am poorer for it.

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  11. Glad to hear your opinion zerosozha. Now the point of the system isn't necessarily to force them to choose a career but to get the tools for the future. Students know from an earlier age their skills and weaknesses and with proper guidance(something schools don't offer today) you can set up a path that doesn't rely to heavily on forcing them to make choices.

    Also I'm glad you got a proper English course. I was rather disapointed with my states AP
    English. Also not all of us have the benefit of being able to move up to that higher level.

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  12. Primary schooling should only consist of the basic needs of humans. Example: Language, Calculations, History of that Country, and the few things that keep us a live.

    NOTHING ELSE

    I am sick of learning about the shit I don't care about.

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  13. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  14. Seeing as people change their majors throughout college, I doubt highschoolers would be certain what they want to do with the rest of their lives, this should be reserved only for people who have wanted to be doctors or lawyers since they were 5.

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  15. Enough American v Europe comments. I refuse to have such barbarianism in my blog.

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  16. Naw, I need to break the habit of writing like I speak. I'm pretty much a redneck so stuff like this happens all the time and nobody corrects me. How else will I learn?

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  17. We kinda have that in Canada, don't really know much about other school systems. It's pretty much standard classes with no "personalization" until 10th grade, where you can choose some optional classes and if you want to learn the mandatory ones at a work level, at a prep-college or at a prep-uni level. The benefits of teaching everyone a lot about everything is reducing the level of overspecialization, where people are useless outside of ONE THING. It's good to be versatile.

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